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2
1860 Plat Map of Aboite Township, Wayne County, Indiana
1860 Plat Map of Aboite Township, Wayne County, Indiana
For research purposes, this map will permit a future study to determine where Catharine and family lived as reported in the 1860 federal census. It appears that Andrew, her husband, was likely dead by this time. 
 
3
A brief history of John Rudolph Waymire, from the recent publication 'The Quest for John Rudolph Waymire'
A brief history of John Rudolph Waymire, from the recent publication "The Quest for John Rudolph Waymire"
Status: Located;  
 
4
A brief history of Reuben McBride
A brief history of Reuben McBride
 
 
5
A Brief History of the Hoover Family's Emmigration
Taken from 'The History of Montgomery County, Ohio'
A Brief History of the Hoover Family's Emmigration Taken from "The History of Montgomery County, Ohio"
Status: Located; Daniel Hoover, Sr., and Hannah Mast were married on a farm situated upon the banks of the Uhwarri River, in Randolph County. N. C.. and came to this county with the colony of first settlers of Randolph Township.

Some of the men had made a trip north, seeking land, and finding at Cincinnati that the land office was not yet open, and that the splendid lands west of the Miami River were yet open for entry. they came up to the Dayton settlement. and being satisfied with the outlook. returned to their people in North Carolina.

In organizing the colony it was decided that the roads were too rough and the distance too great to haul furniture: therefore the wagons were loaded with provisions, clothing. cooking utensils, and a few farming implements, leaving room for the women and children to ride.
It was a long. lonely journey over the mountains, across the rivers, and through the hundreds of miles of dense, unbroken forest. yet it was an old road easily followed, although entirely unimproved.
The colony started in 1801, and did not sleep under a roof until their arrival at a point ten miles south of Dayton, near where Ridgeville, Warren County, now is; where they stopped for the winter.

The important thing then was the selection of land, and to get a tract upon which the families could locate. An exploring party made several trips up the Southwest Branch of the Stillwater River, and finally were agreed to locate on the west bank of that river, ten or twelve miles from Dayton; with Mr. Hoover taking the southeast quarter of Section 10. Cabin sites were selected, roads were marked out, and in some cases were at least partially opened to the Indian trail leading to Dayton. Capt. Mast and Daniel Hoover made the land entries at the Cincinnati office. In March, all being read, the colony left their winter quarters, and passing through Dayton. where they crossed the Miami, arrived upon their lands March 20, 1802.

Three-faced cabins of saplings were put up as temporary shelter for the families, while the men were clearing up patches to plant what corn and potatoes they had left. There was big work to be done. Hills and valleys were heavily timbered, slow, hard work was before the men in the clearings, and there was no place for drones in that colony. Fortunately for them, it was an early spring. and a long, dry season, and what planting they did do, turned out well.

It was the frontier settlement. and it took brave men to stay there. There was not a white man’s cabin beyond them. Indian war parties and trading parties were constantly passing along the trails, and hunting parties were roaming the woods. Fleets of their canoes were upon the rivers. In fact, the country was yet in control of the savages, and the Hoover settlement was the advance post of civilization.

Mrs. Mary Sheets, who is living in Randolph Township, daughter of Daniel and Hannah Hoover, remembers that one day while they were yet living in the huts, she and her younger sister being alone, an Indian made his appearance, frightening them very much, but soon went away.

The road cut through by a division of Wayne's army, east from Fort St. Clair, along what has since been known as the "Sled Road." to Salem Creek, near Salem, thence north to Fort Greenville, was at that time used exclusively by the Indians; and at all times, except winter, camping parties were located at the fine springs along Stillwater, Greenville Creek, and at some of the Salem Creek springs. These were favorite hunting and fishing grounds, not given up by the savages until after 1811.
All kinds of game were to be had in plenty in the woods, but after the Hoover Mill was built (the pioneer mill, built, in 1803), the Indians brought in to trade for corn meal more venison, bear meat and wild turkeys, than the family could use.

Block-houses were necessarily built in all neighborhoods north of Dayton, and those west of Stillwater were used every year until 1815. At times of special alarm, the families remained in the block-houses, and all cattle and stock were corralled. The years 1800, 1809 and 1812 were specially trying times, and were about the only issues that were deemed too dangerous for the men--although they were strongly guarded to work in the fields.

The Indian outrages over on Greenville Creek in 1812 of course spread terror through the frontier. Settlers from all that section fled to the stronger line of block-houses from New Lexington across to the Miami. The men were on guard night and day, and although the savages did not molest neighborhoods in this county. great excitement prevailed until Fort Greenville was garrisoned lay militia.

Daniel Jr. son of Daniel and Hannah Hoover, was born in 1802, after the arrival of the colony; and was the first white child born in Randolph Township. He owns and is living upon, part of the farm that, his father settled on, and upon which he was born-the southeast corner of the section.
Randolph Township was organized November 6, 1801, and by influence of the colony from North Carolina was named for the county from which they had emigrated.

Daniel Hoover, Jr. remembers that in 1811, when he was nine years old, a party of 800 friendly Indians camped on his father's farm. This was just before the battle of Tippecanoe, and when the Indians broke camp they followed the trail west to the Wabash. Years after that, Mr. Hoover saw the Indian chief, Shane, at Fort Wayne, Indiana, who told him that he had crept inside the American lines as a spy the night before the battle at Tippecanoe, drew a bead on Gen. Harrison, but for his own safety did not fire.

Daniel Hoover, Jr., married Susan Byrkett in 1822. Mrs. Hoover also came from North Carolina.
She remembers that her parents filled a large jar with wild honey, dried five bushels of noodles, and put up other provisions for the long journey through the woods. They had great difficulty in crossing the Alleghenies. For three years after their arrival in Randolph Township, the family lived upon corn bread, potatoes, game and fish.

From the heavy timber to be cleared away, progress at the Hoover settlement was slow, yet was never checked, and at the time of the marriage of Daniel Hoover, Jr.. all Government lands had been taken up. Roads, however, were in bad condition, and in wet seasons were almost impassable.

The children of Daniel and Susan Hoover were Hannah. Eli, Levina, Andrew Jackson, Henry Clay, Abraham, James Elliott, Sarah Ann, William, Charles and Eliza Jane. Hannah. James E. and Sarah Ann are dead. Eli, William and Charles were born blind, were educated at Columbus, Ohio, and became accomplished both in vocal and instrumental music. Levina married Enos Embree: Andrew J. married Charlotte Gable; Henry C. married Ann Barbara Cook; Abraham married Julian Gable; and Elza Jane married George W. Eby.

368 - HISTORY OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY.
The aged couple, Mr. and Mrs. Hoover, are living a quiet. comfortable life on the old farm, with their children and grandchildren around them, often entertaining their friends and descendants with interesting stories and incidents of the early days and settlement of the Stillwater Valley. A happy couple of old school people, retired from active farm life, they are living in the memories of the past. and contentedly enjoying the blessings with which they are surrounded. 
 
6
A favourite poem...of Velma's
A favourite poem...of Velma's
Status: Located; You cannot pray the Lord's Prayer
And even once say "I."
Nor can you pray the Lord's Prayer
And even once say "My."
Nor can you pray the Lord's Prayer
And not pray for another
For when you ask for daily bread
You must include your brother
For others are included
In each and every plea;
From the beginning to the end of it
It does not once say "Me." 
 
7
A Squaw Fight--1858
A Squaw Fight--1858
 
 
8
A Tribute to Andrew Smith Gibbons, Pioneer
A Tribute to Andrew Smith Gibbons, Pioneer
Status: Located;  
 
9
Biography of Moses Key
'Key and Allied Families'
by Julian Cn. Lane
Biography of Moses Key "Key and Allied Families" by Julian Cn. Lane
 
 
10
Birthday party for William Hedrick
Birthday party for William Hedrick
 
 
11
Brief overview of Andrew Smith Gibbons
From an unknown LDS historical publication
Brief overview of Andrew Smith Gibbons From an unknown LDS historical publication
 
 
12
Civil War Service Record of Company D, 90th Regiment, Fifth Cavalry, Indiana Volunteers
Civil War Service Record of Company D, 90th Regiment, Fifth Cavalry, Indiana Volunteers
Status: Located; Service record shows the action Company D saw during the Civil Ward. Thomas George and his brother Patrick both enlisted together, with Thomas surviving the action but Patrick was killed near Knoxville, Tennessee.  
 
13
DAR record of Thomas Patton
DAR record of Thomas Patton
States he was buried in the Burk Cemetery; which is located several hundred feet from the west boundary of his farm. No record of his burial is found in the original Sextant's documentation; but this DAR record authenticates the belief that he was buried here. 
 
14
Deed of Conveyance from G.W. Chapman to Catharine Riley—
Roanoke, Indiana
Deed of Conveyance from G.W. Chapman to Catharine Riley— Roanoke, Indiana
This indenture, Witnesseth, that George W. Chapman and Harriet Chapman, his wife, in consideration of the sum of twelve hundred dollars to them paid by Catharine Reilly of Huntington County in the State of Indiana, the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged, do hereby deed, convey, release and forever quit claim to the said Catharine Reilly her heirs and assigns forever. The following real estate in Huntington County and state of Indiana, and described as follows:

Commencing at the southeast corner of street sixteen on the original plat of the town of Roanoke, in the said Huntington County—thence running east in a line with second street in said town of Roanoke to Commercial Street one chain and twelve links—thence a north east course along Commercial Street to Third Street four chains thence west along Third Street to the northeast corner of Street Number Thirteen, on said original plat of Roanoke—two chains and fifty links thence south along the east line of Lots numbered 13, 14, 15 16 to the place of beginning—three chains and seventy links containing one hundred and twenty six square rods of land, more or less. And being that part of the mill lease (leased by the trustee of Wabash ad Erie Canal to Samuel G. Jones from the first of November 1846 to run thirty years, on which the dwelling house for the use of the mill on said least is situated together with all the privileges and appurtenances to the same belong.

To have and to hold the said Catharine Reilly and her heirs and assigns forever on witness to hereof the said George W. Chapman and Harriet Chapman, his wife who hereby relinquishes her dower in said premises, have herento set their hands and seals this 20th day of November 1855 A.D,

G.W. Chapman (Seal)
Harriet Chapman (Seal)

NOTE!
A chain is 66’ in length, divided into 100 links of 0.66’
A rod is 16.5’
A square rod is 272,25 square feet

In the description above, 126 square rods = 34,303.5 sq. feet, or 0.788 acres.
 
 
15
Deed of conveyance to Andrew Riley,29 November 1848:  Stark County, Ohio
Deed of conveyance to Andrew Riley,29 November 1848: Stark County, Ohio
Deed likely conveys land to Andrew Riley in 1848--4 years after his marriage to Catharine Hoover. Andrew and his family are found in the 1850 Stark County census. Further investigation is warranted to ensure that the land deeded corresponds to the locale specified within the census return. 
 
16
Email from Stewart Dukes
Clarifies birth date and other information.
Email from Stewart Dukes Clarifies birth date and other information.
 
 
17
Emmerson Family Crest
Provided by Leslie Deane
Emmerson Family Crest Provided by Leslie Deane
 
 
18
Extract from 1927 Wiggins Directory
Extract from 1927 Wiggins Directory
Provided detailed information about North Reston, Lincolnshire. 
 
19
From 'The History of Whitley County'
From "The History of Whitley County"
This entry details the military service of Joseph Fries and Franklin Freese; both listed side by side in this document. The name Franklin Freese appears on the Civil War memorial in front of the courthouse; but it does not contain the name of Joseph Fries. Even with differing spellings of the Fries surname, after a thorough examination of many records it is believed that these two were brothers.

There are conflicting records found in the Civil War records found on Ancestry.com; with one showing Joseph Fries was mustered out at the close of the civil war; and one record indicates he deserted. If he fought with General Sheridan against the indians after the Civil War, as stated in letter by Leo Joseph Fries, then it is unlikely that he was a deserter.

Joseph also went on to be a constable in Illinois, before settling with his wife to an agrarian lifestyle in Marion, Indiana. A search of military burial records does not turn up an interment for Joseph in the Marion National Cemetery; although George Fries states he is buried there. Further research is warranted. 
 
20
Gravesite of Jacob Hoover
Located in Bradford Cemetery
Gravesite of Jacob Hoover Located in Bradford Cemetery
 
 
21
History and Photo of the current New Bethel Baptist Church
History and Photo of the current New Bethel Baptist Church
Status: Located; This church was first organized in 1828, and it's location is only a mile or so from the Patton and Hoover farms. Much research has gone into this church--but we are still unsure if it was a church that the Hoovers or Pattons attended. Most likely, it is not--but research is continuing. 
 
22
History of Robert Emerson and Ann Found
History of Robert Emerson and Ann Found
Married by banns, 9th day of January 1811 at Alvestone Parish, Southampton, England
Robert Emerson went into the Navy and was superannuated as boatswain of H.M.S. Sheldrake, June 30, 1817, given at Chatham 3 July 1817. He was wrecked in HMS Boreas (Commander Scott) on the Hanny Rocks, off Guernsey, in 1807. He also served in HMS Victory. He was baptized October 5, 1777, at South Somecotes, Co. Lincoln. He left issue: (Children) 
 
23
Incorporation information for Fulton County, Ohio
Incorporation information for Fulton County, Ohio
Provided for reference in future research. 
 
24
Information on Jacob Hoover 
Found on Findagrave.com
Information on Jacob Hoover Found on Findagrave.com
 
 
25
Letter from Ralph Gates to Leo
Whitley County Civil War Monument
Letter from Ralph Gates to Leo Whitley County Civil War Monument
Letter provided by Mary Lou Fries
"I was cleaning a closet and found a letter written by Ralph Gates to Leo. They both graduated from Columbia City High School in 1911. They were college roommates. Ralph was Indiana's Governor from 1945 through 1949. I thought you would be interested in the handwritten note about the Civil War Monument.

The copy of the envelope is Pappy's (Leo) writing. He had mailed his high school graduation program to his sister Rosa. Rosa married E. P. Regan. 
 
26
Moses Key  biography
Page #3
Moses Key biography Page #3
 
 
27
Moses Key biography
Page #2
Moses Key biography Page #2
 
 
28
Newspaper article on the Civil War Memorial
Whitley County, Indiana
Newspaper article on the Civil War Memorial Whitley County, Indiana
Status: Located; Thomas Riley's name is engraved on one of the stones of this monument. 
 
29
Newspaper clipping of a knife fight involving William Hedrick
Newspaper clipping of a knife fight involving William Hedrick
 
 
30
obituary of Catherine (Ulerich) Fries
obituary of Catherine (Ulerich) Fries
Status: Located; Posted in the Columbia City Post
7 October 1930 
 
31
Obituary of Isaac N. Hoover
Logansport Pharos
August 14, 1899
Obituary of Isaac N. Hoover Logansport Pharos August 14, 1899
 
 
32
Obituary of Jacob Calvin Overmier
Obituary of Jacob Calvin Overmier
 
 
33
Obituary of Velma Ruth Riley Snowden
Obituary of Velma Ruth Riley Snowden
Status: Located;  
 
34
Obituary of William Riley --  Marion  Leader Tribune, July 2, 1926.
Obituary of William Riley -- Marion Leader Tribune, July 2, 1926.
Status: Located; RILEY FUNERAL ON SATURDAY

Funeral Services for William Riley, 43, former Marion man, who was accidentally electrocuted in South Bend Tuesday afternoon, will be held at the St. Paul's church of Marion at 8 o'clock Saturday morning with Father Durham in charge. Burial will be at the St. Paul of the Cross cemetery at Columbia City, where the electrocuted man was born.

The body arrived in marion last night at 5:05, and was taken to the home of a sister, Mrs. J.E. Walters, 622 Wabash avenue. 
 
35
Passenger List
Ship SS Saturnia
20 October 1923 Arrival Date
Passenger List Ship SS Saturnia 20 October 1923 Arrival Date
Agnes and children David, Sarah, Andrew, Janet and Annie apparently sailed from England to America themselves; with Robert presumably already in the United States. 
 
36
Passenger Manifest
Ship Zealandic, Leaving Liverpool England to Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Arrival in Sydney, New South Wales, on 15 November 1913
Passenger Manifest Ship Zealandic, Leaving Liverpool England to Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Arrival in Sydney, New South Wales, on 15 November 1913
Mr. Henry Lead
Mrs. Amy Lead
Miss Nellie Lead
Master Gilbert Lead
Miss Ida Lead 
 
37
Peace at Last
Peace at Last
Status: Located;  
 
38
Personal published history of Walter Knott
The History of Fayette County, Indiana
Personal published history of Walter Knott The History of Fayette County, Indiana
Provided by Greg Hinshaw 
 
39
Richard Hufton Death Record
North Somercotes Parish Records
February 23, 1956
Richard Hufton Death Record North Somercotes Parish Records February 23, 1956
 
 
40
Snowden marriages in the Parish Records of Goulceby, Lincolnshire, England
Taken from the International Genealogical Index
Snowden marriages in the Parish Records of Goulceby, Lincolnshire, England Taken from the International Genealogical Index
Items #1 and #2, Elizabeth (1822) and Ann (1820) are known children of Thomas and Eliza Snowden. Items #3 and #4, Eliz Snowden (1706) and Rob Snoden (1661), are not yet identified and are not currently known as direct ancestors of Thomas Snowden.

There is a larger town located several miles from Goulceby called Horncastle, which has a large population of Snowdens throughout the 1700 and 1800's. No direct link to these people has been made; but there does appear to be a strong possibility that these are the ancestors of Thomas. 
 
41
Some Emerson history
Some Emerson history
 
 
42
St. Mary Ann's Parish Church
St. Mary Ann's Parish Church
Status: Located; A Short History of St. Mary Anne's

In 1706, owing to the lack of the established church on the northern shore of the Elk River, the colonial legislature and governor of Maryland established the North Elk Parish. As was the custom in England, the Lord of the Manor on which the parish was to be located, in this case, Henry Harford, the illegitimate son of Frederick, Lord Baltimore, set aside four acres of land for the establishment of the church buildings. Early survey maps indicate that sometime between 1709 and 1715 a wooden church was built on this land, the site of the present church, but no details about this first building are known.

The Reverend Jonas Auren, a Swedish Lutheran clergyman, came to New Sweden late in the 1600's and stayed in America until his death in 1713. Most of this time he was in Cecil County (founded in 1674), preaching for a congregation of English, Swedes, and Finns. This congregation became the congregation of St. Mary Anne's, and the Rev. Mr. Auren its first Rector.

Upon her death in 1714, Queen Anne bequeathed a sum to be used to establish the Anglican Church in the colonies. St. Mary's received a large Bible, a Book of Common Prayer, and a silver chalice and Paten from this source which are still used on occasion today. It is thought that gratitude for these gifts brought about the addition of Anne to the church's name, resulting in the unique name, St. Mary Anne's.

In 1743, the Vestry contracted with Henry Baker for the building of a brick church, at a cost of 300 pounds, to replace the old wooden structure. A detailed description of this building can be found in the minutes of the Vestry dated March 1, 1743, and, except for the bell tower, which was added later, the church which was built is the church you see today. 
 
43
Story of Mariah's plight provided by Velma Riley Snowden
Story of Mariah's plight provided by Velma Riley Snowden
 
 
44
Survivors of Company E, 17th Indiana Volunteers
Survivors of Company E, 17th Indiana Volunteers
Taken from "The History of Whitley County" the names of Joseph Fries and Franklin Freese are shown as survivors from Company E, 17th Indiana Volunteers. I is unlikely that Joseph would have attended the functions referenced had he been a deserter. 
 
45
The Battle of Beecher Island
The Battle of Beecher Island
According to Leo Fries, the nephew of Joseph Fries: After leaving the fighting of the Civil War Joseph enlisted with General Sheridan to fight indians on the western frontier. According to Leo, Joseph was badly wounded, but survived the fighting. Following is the story of the Battle of Beacher Island.
--------------
In an indecisive but bitterly fought battle at this site, a force of about 50 frontiersmen under Maj. George A. Forsyth engaged more than 1,000 Sioux and Cheyennes, led by Roman Nose, Pawnee Killer, and other chiefs. Pursued all the way from Fort Wallace, Kans., on September 16, 1868, the Indians turned on the troops, who entrenched themselves on a small sandy island in the Arikaree River. During the 9-day siege and the repeated Indian charges that followed, volunteers worked their way through enemy lines to obtain reinforcements from Fort Wallace, 125 miles away, who drove off the Indians. Casualties were heavy on both sides. Half the soldiers were wounded, Forsyth four times. The dead included Roman Nose and Lt. Frederick W. Beecher, after whom the island came to be named. Immediately after this battle, Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan began his 1868-69 winter campaign.

The island has long since disappeared because of shifting river channels, but a large monument near the post office at the town of Beecher Island commemorates the battle. 
 
46
The Battle of Fort Henry, Tennssee.  Erasmus Fries was critically wounded during this battle.  --Leo Joseph Fries letter
The Battle of Fort Henry, Tennssee. Erasmus Fries was critically wounded during this battle. --Leo Joseph Fries letter
Status: Located;  
 
47
The Obituary of Frank Friese
From the Columbia City Post
The Obituary of Frank Friese From the Columbia City Post
Status: Located; Frank often spelled his name as Friese, while many of the family chose the abbreviated spelling of Fries. Other variations of the family surname also appear in public documents; likely because most name spelling was phonetic, with many persons in this era not fully literate in reading and writing. 
 
48
The Passing of Grandma Riley--Rose Ann Fries
The Passing of Grandma Riley--Rose Ann Fries
Status: Located;