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A brief history of John Rudolph Waymire, from the recent publication "The Quest for John Rudolph Waymire"



John Rudolph Waymire was born in Hanover, Germany about the year 1725. He was tall, erect, and of great physical strength. After having served his term of military service as required in those days, he was retained by the king as an officer in his body guard. Six feet six inches in height and two hundred and twenty-five pounds in weight was the minimum physical requirements to become a member of this unit. The king being impressed by his executive ability and undaunted courage, soon made him governor of a province that had recently been acquired through conquest. Ere long, he aroused the displeasure of the king by refusing to execute a mandate which he considered unjust. For this insubordination he was thrown into prison for thirty days. Upon release he openly voiced his displeasure of the punishment bestowed and vowed he would leave the country. The king hearing of this had him again placed in prison for a like period of time. This did not dispel his anger but taught him to be more cautious of his speech. So he quietly made his plans to go to America. In the summer of 1753, he with his wife and two children, his father and mother and two sisters, took passage at Hamburg on the ship Leathley. After a long and perilous journey of several weeks, during which the mother died and was buried at sea, the party landed at Philadelphia September 19, 1753. In the Pennsylvania archives is the Ship List of the Leathley for this trip in which appears the name "Johan Ludolph Weymeyer" signed by himself in a very legible hand. The spelling of the name plainly shows that is had not as yet been anglicized. In the same list appears the name "Voltine Weymeyer" signed by himself. Probably this was the father. Upon landing in Philadelphia, the sisters were separated from the other members of the family and never afterwards were seen or heard of. They settled somewhere in the rural districts of Pennsylvania, to us not known, where the father died in 1757. That same year the family moved to what is now Randolph County, North Carolina and settled on the Uwharie River. At that time Guilford County included, among other lands, the territory within the present boundaries of Randolph County. Here he resided the remainder of his days; and it was here on one of the city hills of the old North State that his remains were laid to rest. He was married twice. His German wife's name was Lough. She bore him eight children; the first on being a boy, all the others, girls. His second wife, Miss Elizabeth Louck, bore him seven children, all boys; making a total of fifteen children, all of whom grew to manhood and womanhood, married and had families. It is estimated that up to the present time (early 1950's), Rudolph Waymire had more than thirty thousand descendants. These people, mostly farmers, were not altogether pleased with the agricultural conditions of North Carolina. The river valleys were very fertile, but narrow and subject to disastrous floods at the time of freshets; the rest of the land was rock infested, clayey hills, mostly impossible to cultivate and non productive. Then again, this state permitted the institution of slavery, and as most of these people were Quakers, it was galling to their natures to constantly witness around them the workings of this iniquitous, barbarous system. Because of these conditions and environments they had for some time contemplated migrating to the new lands in the northwest. Immediately after the death of the father, the children began the exodus from the old North State and by 1808 had all migrated to Ohio, settling at first in Warren, Montgomery, and Miami Counties. Some remained here while others soon migrated farther west and scattered in different directions until today, his descendants are found throughout all parts of the United States and Canada.

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